>

Wednesday, 10 October 2012

Eid Al-Adha Mubarak... What is Eid Al-Adha?




Eid Al Adha Mubarak

I expect the Muslims to know what Eid al-Adha is but not anyone else really, so I thought I'd write a little about this celebration to introduce it. The word "eid" means celebration or feast, so Muslims celebrate this day by dressing smartly, going to the mosque and praying the eid prayer, visiting friends and family, exchanging gifts and feasting together. Al-Adha roughly means "The sacrifice/slaughter". So all together it means the "Celebration of the Sacrifice". Muslims worldwide celebrate two eids annually, the other being Eid Al-Fitr, which marks the end of the holy month fasting, Ramadhan. Eid Al-Fitr and is the larger eid of the two.

"The Celebration of the Sacrifice", or Eid Al-Fitr, refers to the slaughtering of a ram (sheep). The backstory goes something like this: Prophet Abraham (PBUH), having lived a long life and being married to Sarah (RA) for a long while, was without any children because his wife was barren. The family wanted to have a child so Sarah asked her servant Hagar if she would like to marry Abraham and she agreed and sure enough she became pregnant. Soon enough the little baby boy was born and they called him Ismaeel (Ishmael). After a few years, Prophet Abraham started having dreams where he was commanded to take his only son to a certain place outside the city and slaughter him with a sharp knife. Now you can probably imagine how overjoyed they were, having been childless for so long, and then they were blessed with a child - now they became especially distressed that they would lose their only child. But Abraham, being a Prophet, knew it was a command from God and went to his son and told him what he planned to do. Rather than screaming, running-away or rebelling, the young Ishmael accepted this command from God and accepted his presumed fate. So the next morning, the Prophet took a sharp knife, some rope to bind the child's limbs together and awoke Ismaeel to guide him to an alter where he would soon carry out the slaughter. They walked a while before they got there and ishmael willingly presented his hands and legs to be bound, and they were, and he was positioned, ready for slaughter. Then Abraham raised the razor-sharp knife and uttered the name of God and was about to strike Ismaeel when God commanded an angel to stop him from killing his son and replace the child with a ram (sheep) to be slaughtered instead. Thus, both Ishmael and Abraham were tested by their Lord and succeeded and their spiritual stations were raised.

This story and many others related to the stories of Abraham, considered the grandfather of the Prophets, are commemorated by the Muslims during the pilgrimage rites. One of the rituals of the pilgrimage is the slaughter of an animal like a sheep, cow, camel or goat, and they cook and eat some of it and give the rest to friends, family and the poor. Eid al-Adha is also know as Eid al-Hujjaj - Eid of the Pilgrims - and Eid al-Adha marks the completion of the pilgrimage event. The day of completion is on the 10th day of the last month of the Muslim Calender, the month of Dhul-Hijjah. To read more about the pilgrimage, or hajj, please check out the About Islam section of the website - The Five pillars of Islam: Hajj (Pilgrimage). And if you would like to view some photos from Makkah and the pilgrimage and also from Madina,


The two most important words -- "Thank you!"

Eid al-Adha


Eid al-Adha is an Islamic festival to commemorate the willingness of Ibrahim (also known as Abraham) to follow Allah's (God's) command to sacrifice his son Ishmael. Muslims around the world observe this event.
Eid al Adha
Animals are decorated in plastic jewellery for Eid al-Adha, a holiday celebrated in memory of Abraham's sacrifice. 

What do people do?

At Eid al-Adha, many Muslims make a special effort to pray and listen to a sermon at a mosque. They also wear new clothes, visit family members and friends and may symbolically sacrifice an animal in an act known as qurbani. This represents the animal that Ibrahim sacrificed in the place of his son.
In some traditionally Muslim countries, families or groups of families may purchase an animal known as udhiya, usually a goat or sheep, to sacrifice, but this is not common or legal in many parts of Australia, Canada, New Zealand, the United Kingdom, the United States or many other countries. In these countries, groups of people may purchase a whole carcass from a butcher or slaughterhouse and divide it amongst themselves or just buy generous portions of meat for a communal meal on Eid-al-Adha. People also give money to enable poorer members of their local community and around the world to eat a meat-based meal.
In the period around Eid al-Adha, many Muslims travel to Mecca and the surrounding area in Saudi Arabia to perform the Hajj pilgrimage. Package holidays are organized from many countries. Muslims may plan and save for many years to enable them to take part in this event, which is one of the five pillars of Islam.

Public life

Eid al-Adha is a public holiday in places such as the Indonesia, Jordan, Malaysia, Turkey, and the United Arab Emirates. It is not a nationwide public holiday in countries such as Australia, Canada, the United Kingdon or the United State. However, some Islamic organizations may be closed or offer a reduced level of service and there may be some local congestion around mosques in countries where Eid al-Adha is not a public holiday.

Background

Ibrahim, known as Abraham in the Christian and Jewish traditions, was commanded by God to sacrifice his adult son. He obeyed and took Ishmael (Ismail or Ismael) to Mount Moriah. Just as he was to sacrifice his son, an angel stopped him and gave him a ram to sacrifice in place of his son. Some people dispute that the son of sacrifice was Isaac (Isḥāq). Regardless, these events are remembered and celebrated at Eid al-Adha.
The Islamic calendar is based on observations of the moon and the length of a particular month can vary between years. For this reason, predicted dates of Eid al-Adha may be corrected at the start of the month of Dhul Hijja. This is around 10 days before the start of the festival.

The two most important words -- "Thank you!"

Wednesday, 19 September 2012

WE LOVE MALAYSIA


This video tells the perseverance of a young man who still cultivate nature will love the country even though the world has increasingly moved modesasi current.

video


The two most important words -- "Thank you!"

Tuesday, 18 September 2012

OUR MALAYSIA DAY



Malaysia Day 2012 marks the day that Malaya, Singapore, North Borneo, and Sarawak unified to form Malaysia on September 16, 1953. It should not be confused with Malaysian Independence Day (Hari Merdeka), which is on August 31 and marks the day when Malaysia gained its freedom from the British. The unification of Malay was actually supposed to take place on August 31, 1953 but was delayed to September because of opposition from the nearby nations like the Philippines and Indonesia. In 2010, Malaysia Day was declared a public federal holiday.

Delaying Malaysia Day
The delay was also made to allow the U.N to hold polls in the countries of Sarawak and North Borneo in order to ensure that both nations agreed to the idea of unification with Malaysia and Singapore. The bill that first introduced the idea of unifying was called the Malaysia Bill, which was brought to the attention of Parliament in July earlier in the year. It was approved and signed into law by Yang di-Pertuan Agong (head of state) on August 29.

The two most important words -- "Thank you!"

Monday, 17 September 2012

Malaysia Day

Malaysia Day 2012 marks the day that Malaya, Singapore, North Borneo, and Sarawak unified to form Malaysia on September 16, 1953. It should not be confused with Malaysian Independence Day (Hari Merdeka), which is on August 31 and marks the day when Malaysia gained its freedom from the British. The unification of Malay was actually supposed to take place on August 31, 1953 but was delayed to September because of opposition from the nearby nations like the Philippines and Indonesia. In 2010, Malaysia Day was declared a public federal holiday.

 The participants of Malaysia do a formation at "Dataran Merdeka"



The two most important words -- "Thank you!"

Sunday, 16 September 2012

COMPLICATIONS IN FORMATION OF MALAYSIA


Not all nations agreed to combining to form one state. North Borneo demanded that 20 conditions be met before it would agree to form one single federation. The 20 conditions dealt with matters ranging from religion, naming of the federation, tariffs, government representation, education, secession, immigration, language, and many other topics. The 20 conditions were approved. These days, there are many people in Malaysia who argue that some of the conditions have been violated.

Before Malaysia Day took place, Sarawak had already gained its independence earlier in July of the same year. Singapore and North Borneo gained independence together simultaneously in August, and the unified federation of Malaysia would gain its independence 4 years later in August 1957.

The two most important words -- "Thank you!"

Saturday, 15 September 2012

MERDEKA


MERDEKA PARADE
MERDEKA UNITY





KUALA LUMPUR: Countrymen from all race and religious backgrounds came together to reminiscence yet again, the 55th Independence Day celebration.


The Masjid Jamek vicinity was already filled with excited people as early as 7am, with locals and tourists alike, who kept chanting 'Merdeka, Merdeka, Merdeka..', which was first uttered by the late Tunku Abdul Rahman Putra al-Haj, the Independence Father or Bapa Kemerdekaan of the country, witnessing the birth of a liberal  Malaysia.
Policemen and armed forces personnels marched in accurate consistency, while jetplanes and helicopters joined the festivities on air, thrilling the crowd.
The sight of 50 policemen on stallions was also another sight to behold.
Right after, a flash mob performance set the crowd grooving while waving Malaysia flags to the accompaniment of evergreen Merdeka songs.
The crowd were also chanting the 1Malaysia slogan, filling the air with the spirit of patriotism.

The two most important words -- "Thank you!"